Monthly Archive for April, 2008

Librarians Rock!

If you missed the Pueblo Spring workshop or you forgot to bring your camera, you can get a taste of what the event was like through these pics on Flickr. I must say we had a great time with over 300 librarians gathering to chat, learn, and break bread together (heck, even play Guitar Hero!). CLiC has received numerous emails saying that this event was the best one yet! Kudos to all the presenters, volunteers, and the librarians who attended! It was a blast!


Continue Your Education on YouTube

Yep, you heard right- YouTube is educational. Want a short three minute overview on how a Wiki works? Click on the video below. Want to figure out how podcasting works – try this. Can’t figure out why one would want to keep photos online? Watch this. If you have dutifully clicked on all of these links, then congratulate yourself if you see a pattern. Commoncraft makes short videos for the web, and the most enticing part is that they use video and paper to make topics easily understood. Really. Try it, you’ll like it.

Clever librarians at DePauw Libraries have come up with their own dressed up Commoncraftlibrary commercial on YouTube.

Long Live PowerPoint!

What you say? Haven’t we all sat through those long dull PowerPoints slides dotted with one bulleted point after another wishing we could quietly slip away unnoticed? I am here to say that it doesn’t have to be that way. A month ago I read the book Presentation Zen*, which changed the way I will forever look at or create Powerpoints. Then recently I read Karen Shneider’s Free Range Librarian blog about Pecha Kucha (PowerPoint tournaments) events being held at various places around the globe. Contestants have 20 slides (no bulleted points!) with twenty seconds per slide. So, that is 6 minutes and 40 seconds to get their message across. I have watched a few of them online. What surprised me was the fact that most of the PowerPoints are told in storybook format and the slides are like pictures in a book. At the end you totally “get it”. The dullest topics can be enhanced by this method. For instance, I watched a presentation on signage, and not only was it NOT boring, I actually learned how to create signage that will make people stand up and listen. So click on a few of these links and let us know what you think- should PowerPoint presentations live or die?
*Presentation Zen can be interlibrary loaned from the CLiC office.

CLiC Denver office move complete

Thanks for all your patience. The Denver office has been moved and Valerie, Lisa, Shannon, Erin, and Robin are all settling in. Remember the phone number for the office is still the same, 303-422-1150 and the new address is 7400 E. Arapahoe Rd. Suite 105, Cenntenial, CO 80112. Special Kudos to Erin for organizing the move and making everything go smoothly.

ebrary Honors National Library Week

In support of National Library Week, April 13 to 19, 2008, ebrary®, a leading provider of e-content services and technology, today announced that it will provide librarians as well as students and faculty in library science and related programs with complimentary access to its Library Center for one year.

Subsidized by ebrary, the Library Center includes more than 85 full-text e-books covering topics such as digital library development, general collection development, and the history of libraries and librarianship, as well as illustrated guides from the Library of Congress. Contributing publishers include Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Idea Group, Inc., Greenwood Publishing Group, Library of Congress, and MIT Press.

To receive complimentary access, students, faculty, and librarians may register at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=iLchAc260S528_2botn4tcig_3d_3d.
“ebrary is dedicated to serving the needs of the library community, including the next generation of librarians,” said Christopher Warnock, CEO of ebrary. “We are pleased to participate in National Library Week by providing access to a selection of relevant e-books that we hope will provide additional knowledge that students, faculty, and librarians can use today as well as in the future.”